Knitting, Paperback
2 out of 5 (1 rating)


When Sandra is widowed tragically early in her early 40s, with no children to distract her, and a career as a college lecturer only keeping her mildly busy, she feels she needs a new direction in her life.

This comes in the unlikely shape of Martha, a woman she meets completely randomly when they both stop to help in a medical emergency in a shopping mall.

Martha has also experienced grief, but appears to have worked it through.

She is also a keen, talented, but almost obsessive knitter, who lives and breathes her skill.

Sandra is fascinated by her work, and eager to develop other strands to her career, decides to organise an exhibition on the history of women's clothing and textiles, asking Martha to help her by creating replicas of various items.

What follows is not a conventional friendship, nor a conventional healing, but whatever it is, it changes Sandra's life very much for the better...




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An easy and quick read for a sensitive and insightful novel with a strong connection to knitting, yarn and fabric. I wouldn't have picked up this book if I was not a hobby knitter myself.The book is set in Adelaide, southern Australia, and for once I could enjoy reading without flipping the seasons around. The story follows the lives of two very different women. Sandra is a tightly-wound academic, who is trying to cope with the recent loss of her husband to cancer, while Martha is a free spirit who gives most of her time to her creative knitting. A chance meeting of the two women starts an unlikely friendship. As they work together on a vintage knitting exhibition, both women need to deal with their deepest secrets and conflicts. There are no dead bodies or sinister powers at work here, just the usual scars of life. Sandra and Martha slowly find their way to healing them, and to accepting their own flaws.I found the book's rambling about the connection between knitting and writing a little bit tiresome. Sandra's perfectionist tendency to crafting words irritated me, especially as I did not see or read any parts of her lean, and brilliant writing. In contrast Martha's perfectionism was endearing because the garments she created in the process were aptly described. I had the distinct feeling that perhaps the writer is better at knitting than word-crafting.

Also by Anne Bartlett