Daughters of Fire, Paperback
2.5 out of 5 (2 ratings)


The sweeping new novel from the bestselling author of LADY OF HAY switches between Roman Britain and the present day where history dramatically impacts on the lives of three women.

The Romans are landing in Britannia...Cartimandua, the young woman destined to rule the great Brigantes tribe, watches the invaders come ever closer.

Her life has always been a maelstrom of love, conflict and revenge, but it only becomes more turbulent and complicated with power.

Her political skills are threatened by her personal choices, and Cartimandua finds she has made formidable enemies on all sides as she faces a decision which will change the futures of all around her.

In the present day, historian Viv Lloyd Rees has immersed herself in the legends surrounding the Celtic queen.

Viv struggles to hide her visions of Cartimandua and her conviction that they are real.

But her obsession becomes more persistent when she finds an ancient brooch that carries a curse.

Bitter rivalries and overwhelming passions are reawakened as past envelops present and Viv finds herself in the greatest danger of her life.




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Showing 1 - 2 of 2 reviews.

Review by

In theory, this should have blown me away, in fact - I pretty much only finished it because I'm stubborn. Well researched, as far as I can tell, I liked some of the secondary characters, and there are some lovely passages, but the plot structure is, I think, broken. On top of that, the character development doesn't exist, and the constantly shifting point of view issue really doesn't help.

Review by

This book was way too long. It just dragged on and on going back and forth with the characters going crazy and ugh, this took me forever to read (well, 3 months for me is forever). The cursed brooch pin and being spoken to or possessed by long-dead people just isn't my thing, sorry. Perhaps if you're into that sort of thing, you might enjoy this... I wish this would have been only about Cartimandua and not Vivienne, then it would have been a better story.

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