The Sanctuary Seeker, Paperback
4.5 out of 5 (2 ratings)


November, 1194. Appointed by Richard the Lionheart as the first coroner for the county of Devon, Sir John de Wolfe, an ex-Crusader, rides out to the lonely moorland village of Widecombe to hold an inquest on an unidentified body.

On his return to Exeter, the coroner is incense to find that his own brother-in-law, Sheriff Richard de Revelle, is intent on thwarting the murder investigation, particularly when it emerges that the dead man is a Crusader and a member of one of Devon's finest and most honourable families.


  • Format: Paperback
  • Pages: 336 pages
  • Publisher: Simon & Schuster
  • Publication Date:
  • Category: Crime & mystery
  • ISBN: 9780743492058



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Showing 1 - 2 of 2 reviews.

Review by

A general review of this series:This is back in the good old days of law enforcement, when trial by combat was definitive and would-be plea bargainers had to fight their accomplice(s) to the death.I find these books fascinating as living history, perhaps even more than as mysteries. Knight always starts off with a glossary of terms. The period is not romanticized, but neither is it overly repulsive. Sir John de Wolfe went crusading with Richard the Lionheart. Now back in England, he has been appointed to the newly reconstituted office of Crowner (Coroner). He fights a pitched battle with his corrupt, treacherous brother-in-law, the Sheriff, over official territory. He is very unhappily married to Mathilda, his incompatible wife; their relationship makes sleeping in peasant huts while on duty a treat. One of the things that makes it interesting, is that although Sir John is the central character, and presumably to be regarded with sympathy, his marital problems are not entirely blamed upon his wife.John is assisted in his duties by his gigantic man of arms, and his clerk, a frail, defrocked priest.In this volume, Sir John first takes up his duties. His wife urged him to take the unpaid post for the social status, but her brother, the Sheriff, resents the post as an encroachment on his own authority and has his own interest in the case.

Review by

Fun read. This is a very clever approach of setting a mystery in 12th century England, sort-of a fantasy/mystery blend. The author is well-versed in forensics and medieval history, which makes the book seem very realistic. I look forward to reading the rest of the Crowner John series.

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