The Making of the Representative for Planet 8, Paperback

The Making of the Representative for Planet 8 Paperback

2.5 out of 5 (5 ratings)

Description

From the winner of the Nobel Prize for Literature, this is the fourth instalment in the visionary novel cycle 'Canopus in Argos: Archives'.

The handsome, intelligent people of Planet 8 of the Canopean Empire know only an idyllic existence on their bountiful planet, its weather consistently nurturing, never harsh.

They live long, purposeful, untroubled lives. Then one day The Ice begins, and ice and snow cover the planet's surface.

Crops and animals die off, and the people must learn to live with this new desolation.

Their only hope is that, as they have been promised, they will be taken from Planet 8 to a new world.

But when the Canopean ambassador, Johor, finally arrives, he has devastating news: they will die along with their planet.

Slowly they come to understand that their salvation may lie in the creation of one Representative who can save what is most essential to them.

Lessing has written a frightening and, finally, hopeful book, a profound and thought-provoking contribution to the science-fiction genre the novel generally.

Information

  • Format: Paperback
  • Pages: 192 pages
  • Publisher: HarperCollins Publishers
  • Publication Date:
  • Category: Science fiction
  • ISBN: 9780006547181

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Reviews

Showing 1 - 5 of 5 reviews.

Review by
3.5

The shortest of the Archives, but possibly one of the most difficult, Planet 8 is dying, crushed under a weight of ice. The peoples of planet 8 are a result of a canopean plan, their destiny to colonize Rohanda/Shikasta. The canopeans seem to move from their benevolent role, to a more lasiez fair voyueristic role.At times the plot seems pretty thin, but the writing pulls through that with ease and you are left pondering the events.Still a solid read, and it will be intresting to look back over the series and see how it all fits

Review by
3

I know nothing about Doris Lessing other than the fact she was a Nobel Prize winner before buying this - a random purchase. It's a kind of sci fi novel, about a group of people (beings? never know how to write about sci-fi!) put on a planet by a superior race. The climate changes, and, without wanting to spoil the ending, everyone and everything dies. I'm quite sure this is supposed to work on a level that I just didn't get. Still the writing was enjoyable (if such a thing can be said about a story like this). I'm sure there are better places to start if you want to read Lessing.

Review by
2

This is the story of a planet that’s dying due to climate change. It’s basically the tale of a society, with the individuals pretty much interchangeable. There’s very little dialogue, although the characters do raise some philosophical points in long monologues. I wouldn’t really call it a novel, it’s more of a rumination. <br/><br/>Is it worth reading? If you’re in that sort of mood. If you’re tired of ordinary novels, and want to branch out into more experimental fiction. There is something haunting about all these people struggling against the elements, slowly dying as the planet dies, and then carrying on, out-of-body. <br/>

Review by
2

This is the story of a planet that’s dying due to climate change. It’s basically the tale of a society, with the individuals pretty much interchangeable. There’s very little dialogue, although the characters do raise some philosophical points in long monologues. I wouldn’t really call it a novel, it’s more of a rumination. <br/><br/>Is it worth reading? If you’re in that sort of mood. If you’re tired of ordinary novels, and want to branch out into more experimental fiction. There is something haunting about all these people struggling against the elements, slowly dying as the planet dies, and then carrying on, out-of-body. <br/>

Review by
3

I like Lessing and I even like her sci-fi. When I think back on it, it seems a bit simplistic, but when I'm actually reading it, I find it engrossing. I've read her whole series (Canopus in Argos: Archives) and like this one the best.

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