The Woman He Loved Before, Paperback
4 out of 5 (3 ratings)

Description

Libby has a good life with a gorgeous husband and a home by the sea.

But over time she is becoming more unsure if Jack has ever loved her - and if he is over the death of Eve, his first wife. When fate intervenes in their relationship, Libby decides to find out all she can about the man she hastily married and the seemingly perfect Eve.

But in doing so she unearths devastating secrets. Frightened by what she finds and the damage it could cause, Libby starts to worry that she too will end up like the first woman Jack loved ...

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Reviews

Showing 1 - 3 of 3 reviews.

Review by
4

Another great read by Dorothy Koomson. Thanks to bookcrossing I discovered her and am now a fan. Really looking forward to reading her books. Bought this book new and am glad I did. It is not a light chick lit but most of her books have context. That's why i like them so much. It is a sad story about how some decisions at a young age can change your life for the bad, something I am alas very familiar with.<br/>Can't wait for her next book.

Review by
4

Libby has a nice life with a gorgeous husband and a big home by the sea. But over time she is becoming more unsure if Jack has ever loved her ? and if he is over the death of Eve, his first wife. When fate intervenes in their relationship, Libby decides to find out all she can about the man she hastily married and the seemingly perfect Eve. Eventually Libby stumbles across some startling truths about Eve, and is soon unearthing more and more devastating family secrets. Frightened by what she finds and the damage it could cause, Libby starts to worry that she too will end up like the first woman Jack loved.My Thoughts:After reading ‘The Ice Cream Girls’ which I thought was brilliant I then picked up this book. Again I don’t think that the reader should be fooled by the sugary pink cover. Yes this book may be a love story but it does have a darker edge to it. I was actually speechless at one point in the book as I really didn’t see what was coming, and that turned the book from a love story and gave the book it’s edge.I didn’t feel that the book was as good as ‘The Ice Cream Girls’ but I still throughly enjoyed it. I loved Eve’s diary which heavily dominated the story and gave the book that extra something.I first read a DK ‘My Best Friends Girl’ for book group a long time ago and found that very chick lit and I have to say that I really didn’t like it all. If it hadn’t have been for ‘The Ice Cream Girls’ coming on to tv I would’t have picked up another book by DK and I have to say that I am glad I did.My only niggle is that at the beginning Jack is under suspicion from the police about Libby accident and Eve’s death and this was not followed through. This needed a little explianing why then could have been left alone. That as I say is a little niggle.Overall a very entertaining read that had me hooked and I will again look for more of DK books.

Review by
4

The story is told from three perspectives. It features a married couple, Jack and Libby, who are involved in a car crash which is the catalyst for a lot of soul-searching. Jack was previously widowed, and Libby becomes more convinced that he will never love anyone as much as he loved his first wife Eve... and then she comes across Eve's diaries.<br/><br/>It’s a fast-paced book that kept me gripped almost from the beginning. By the time I was half-way through I could barely put it down. It gives insight into a way of life I knew almost nothing about, yet with sympathetic characters; I found myself liking all three of the main protagonists.. There’s more bad language than I was comfortable with, but it’s not out of place in the context. There are also a lot of ‘adult’ situations but very little detail is given. The only scene I found unpleasant was early in the book; I'm glad I kept reading.<br/><br/>For those who have enjoyed this author, I would recommend this; but be aware that she does not skirt around some unpleasant modern issues, and uses strong language freely. <br/>

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