Shields of Pride, Paperback
4 out of 5 (3 ratings)


The year is 1173. King Henry's efforts to crush his rebellious sons ignite bloody border skirmishes throughout the land.

Yet it is a time of triumph for mercenary Josceline de Gael, bastard son of the king's most trusted ally.

Victorious on the battlefield, de Gael suffers sweet defeat when his heart is conquered by the lovely Linnet de Montsorrel.

But their love will find its greatest challenge as the torments of jealousy, suspicion, pride - and an enemy from beyond the grave - threaten all they hold dear.




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Showing 1 - 3 of 3 reviews.

Review by

A slight deviation from what I'm used to reading, but I enjoyed this historical romance. Elizabeth Chadwick has a natural style, and manages to employ what I imagine to be her copious research subtly and practically, without boring the reader or detracting from the story; just enough was explained so that a beginner like myself could picture the scene and follow the action. Linnet is my favourite type of heroine, acting out of love but within the confines of femininity, and the romantic scenes were tastefully described and well-deserved for poor Joscelin! Recommended.

Review by

Set in 1173 during the rebellion of Henry II’s sons and wife, Shields of Pride is about Joscelin de Gael, illegitimate son of William de Rocher and a mercenary soldier. Quick to anger, he feuds with de Rocher’s jealous sons. He meets Linnet de Montsorrel, widow, and they marry, although it is not until later that they fall in love.Shields of Pride is one of Elizabeth Chadwick’s earlier novels, and at about 360 pages, it’s also one of her shortest. Unlike many of her novels, this one doesn’t cover a large time span; the action in this book is tightly-packed. I’ve now read seven of Chadwick’s books, and I have to say that I’m still hooked on them. The author really has a talent for sucking her reader into the story and not letting go until the last page has been turned. Shields of Pride is a little more romance-oriented, but excellent nonetheless. I don’t know if Joscelin and Linnet were real people (they probably were), but I found myself really rooting for them, even as family conflict threatens. The historical detail is exquisite; you can really picture the time period and the people and feel as if you were there. In all, a great read, about the collision of past and present, and the ability to move into one’s future.

Review by

An entertaining read. I want to describe it as a swashbuckler, but it's set in the wrong time period for that. The real world clashes with the chilvalric (?) ideal and Chadwick makes the story ride the tide in a gripping way.

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