Kings of the North, Paperback
4.5 out of 5 (1 rating)


King Kieri's realm has been destabilised by political wrangling and his court is blind to the dangers - until an assassination attempt on their king. And when this backfires, Kieri's enemies start planning an invasion using dragonfire, a force unseen for hundreds of years. In King Mikeli's adjoining kingdom, his crown is threatened by a bandit prince.

Alured the Black claims his lineage gives him dominion over all the lands.

His ambition is boundless, his methods are ruthless and he will not be swayed from his goal, whether or not it undermines a region already on the brink of war.

Dark mages also watch for weakness and hunger for their own lost powers.

The Kings of the North must plan wisely, as disaster is a sword's breadth away.


  • Format: Paperback
  • Pages: 512 pages, black & white illustrations, maps
  • Publisher: Little, Brown Book Group
  • Publication Date:
  • Category: Fantasy
  • ISBN: 9781841497686



Free Home Delivery

on all orders

Pick up orders

from local bookshops


Showing 1 - 1 of 1 reviews.

Review by

The second book in the Paladin’s Legacy series, <i>Kings of the North</i> opens up the focus from King Kieri, King Mikeli and Duke Dorrin to other characters and the more wide-ranging consequences of their new statuses. Treachery brews in all corners of the land; the pirate and self-styled Count Alured the Black positions himself to claim a crown and with it, an all-reaching rule. Misunderstandings and old enmities between Lyonya and Pargun must be addressed anew if peace is to be attained, while Kieri’s own Elven grandmother thwarts his attempts to properly rule his kingdom.I love these books; Moon focuses on details, but then pulls back to show how these small events change the face of an entire world. As with the second book in the <i>Deed of Paksennarion</i> trilogy, <i>Kings of the North</i> now moves more swiftly than the first instalment did, but is still nicely packed with moments of good command and personal warmth between characters; there is even, as before, a <i>dramatis personae</i> posted at the beginning in case any of the minor characters have slipped our memories between books… not that Moon doesn’t continue to include back-story at most meetings, but it’s nice to be able to place a name immediately. I also enjoy how she balances the magic that is a tool for those who train to wield it better, with a sense of depth and wonder behind it.I’m glad I don’t have a long wait for <i>Echoes of Betrayal</i>.

Also by Elizabeth Moon   |  View all