The Land of Long Ago, Hardback
3 out of 5 (1 rating)


Kelly and Kai love to play on the gnarled old tree trunk outside their cottage in the woods: sometimes it becomes a horse, sometimes a crocodile and sometimes even a dragon.

One day a mischievous gnome makes the tree trunk come to life, and the children are whisked off to the Land of Long Ago on the back of the old tree dragon.

On their incredible journey Kelly and Kai meet a princess, rescue a knight and trick the king of the trolls.

But will the old tree dragon stay alive long enough to bring them home again?

A delightful fairy tale from Elsa Beskow, with beautiful illustrations in her unique, classic style.


  • Format: Hardback
  • Pages: 32 pages, colour illustrations
  • Publisher: Floris Books
  • Publication Date:
  • Category: Picture storybooks
  • ISBN: 9780863157714



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When a mischievous gnome transforms the mossy old log that Kai and Kelly have long used as part of their imaginary play into a real dragon, as opposed to a make-believe one, the two children are whisked away on the fantastic adventure of a life-time. Flying far over the sea, the children encounter a mournful princess on the island where they land, weeping for her lost knight, imprisoned in a nearby castle. Determined to help, the children journey to the next island, where they become shepherds to the troll who holds the only key to the knight's prison. Successful in reuniting the star-crossed lovers, Kai and Kelly are feted in the princess's kingdom, and have a wonderful time. But will the dragon-log, swiftly disintegrating, be able to carry them home again, or will they be stuck in the "land of long ago" forever...?Originally published in 1923, as <u>Resan Till Landet Längesen</u>, this original fairy-tale is the twelfth title I have read from celebrated Swedish children's author Elsa Beskow, and while I do not think it the equal of some of her better known work - it simply doesn't have that sense of Nature as a magical force, which so distinguishes some of Beskow's great stories, like <u>The Sun Egg</u> or <u>Children of the Forest</u>; nor does it have the feeling of family warmth found in her tales about [book:Peter and Lotta|797153] - it is nevertheless quite engaging, and charmingly illustrated. Young readers who enjoy tales of dragons, princesses and trolls will undoubtedly enjoy it, as will fans of the author/artist's illustration style.