Fried Green Tomatoes at the Whistle Stop Cafe, Paperback

Fried Green Tomatoes at the Whistle Stop Cafe Paperback

3.5 out of 5 (4 ratings)

Description

The day Idgie Threadgoode and Ruth Jamison opened the Whistle Stop Cafe, the town took a turn for the better.

It was the Depression and that cafe was a home from home for many of us.

You could get eggs, grits, bacon, ham, coffee and a smile for 25 cents.

Ruth was just the sweetest girl you ever met. And Idgie? She was a character, all right. You never saw anyone so headstrong. But how anybody could have thought she murdered that man is beyond me.

Fried Green Tomatoes at the Whistle Stop Cafe is a mouth-watering tale of love, laughter and mystery.

It will lift your spirits and above all it'll remind you of the secret to life: friends.

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Reviews

Showing 1 - 4 of 4 reviews.

Review by
4

Well, here's an anomaly - a book that isn't as good as the film adaptation! Fannie Flagg's novel is almost like a screenplay waiting to be brought to life by the actors. The emotional and dramatic scenes that I remember from the film fall flat here, with one narrative spoiling the events of the other, and none of the characters really makes an impact. Idgie is one of those annoying 'feisty' heroines that everybody loves but nobody really knows, and I didn't warm to her, or Ruth either. The reminiscences of the old woman in the nursing home are exactly that - folk tales, full of larger than life personalities and comic events. Evelyn Couch, to whom Ninny tells her stories, is more sympathetic, and I enjoyed her feminist rages as 'Towanda the Avenger' and her revelation about balls. Great fun.The novel is a quick, light read, but the film really tells the story.

Review by
3

Eighty year old Mrs Threadgoode tells Evelyn Couch about her life she spent in Whistle Stop in the thirties. “The day Idgie Threadgoode and Ruth Jamison opened the Whistle Stop Cafe, the town took a turn for the better. It was the Depression and that cafe was a home from home for many of us. You could get eggs, grits, bacon, ham, coffee and a smile for 25 cents. Ruth was just the sweetest girl you ever met. And Idgie? She was a character, all right. You never saw anyone so headstrong. But how anybody could have thought she murdered that man is beyond me.” My Thoughts:I had seen the film many moons ago and when I saw that it was on telly again last week I thought to myself that I had the book somewhere hiding on my shelf waiting to be read.The book is very quirky and does hit on a lot of issues. I quickly got right into the book but as it progressed I did find that I was getting a little bored with it. I found that it waffled on in places. I can remember that I really enjoyed the film and my mistake is watching film first before reading the book. Not very often do I enjoy the film more than the book but in this case I did. I thought the book was going to focus on domestic violence a little more than what it did from reading another review somewhere, so I think my expectations were a little high.Not a bad read and I can see on LT that a lot or readers loved it but for me it was very average, a little overlong and sometimes issues could have been explored a little more. Perhaps there was too much going on in the book.

Review by
4

This book has everything I as a southern fiction reader love, quirky characters, a little mystery and strong women. I have seen this movie many times but had never read the book and thought it was about time I remedied that with the audio version narrated by the always wonderful Lorna Raver.I liked these characters so much, the true friendships were fabulous the way they all come together to protect their own, it made me want to live in Whistle Stop. I liked the back & forth in time through the storytelling. I wish Mrs. Threadgood had lived to see Evelyn’s transformation that she had so much to do with, I enjoyed this storyline of the empty nester trying to figure out who she is and loved her “coming of age” story. Of course Idgie is a great character a woman born way before her time and her relationship with Ruth is so special and I like how it is up to the reader if they are a lesbian couple or just good friends. Every character in this book brings something to the table and it is a book that stays with you.As I said I listened to this on audio narrated by Lorna Raver who is always a perfect choice in southern fiction!There are so many reviews of this book that I will leave you with if you like southern fiction this book is a must read!4 Stars

Review by
3.5

'The cafe...funny how a little knockabout place like that brought so many people together', June 19, 2014This review is from: Fried Green Tomatoes At The Whistle Stop Cafe (Kindle Edition)Evelyn Couch is a depressed overweight woman in her 50s. This novel follows her progress as she visits an elderly woman in a nursing home. The reminiscences of the latter of Alabama life in the 1930s, the poverty and racism but simultaneously the sense of community, become vivid to her:'Lately, to get her mind off that cold gun and pulling the trigger, she would close her eyes and force herself to hear Mrs Threadgoode's voice and if she breathed deep and concentrated she would soon see herself in Whistle Stop. She would walk down the street and go in Opal's beauty shop...After a comb-out she would stop by to visit with Dot weems at the post office and then on to the cafe where she could see everyone so clearly...She would order lunch and Wilbur Weems and Grady Kilgore would wave to her...Everyone would ask her how she was and the sun was always shining and there would always be a tomorrow.'This is a novel of two strands: on the one hand Evelyn, but also events in 1930s Whistle Stop, most notably a murder mystery...I feared this book might be cloyingly sentimental, but it's actually really touching and enjoyable.