Humble Pie, Paperback Book
3.5 out of 5 (5 ratings)

Description

Everyone thinks they know the real Gordon Ramsay: rude, loud, pathologically driven, stubborn as hell.

But this is his bestselling real story...Humble Pie tells the full story of how he became the world's most famous and infamous chef: his difficult childhood, his brother's heroin addiction and his failed first career as a footballer: all of these things have made him the celebrated culinary talent and media powerhouse that he is today.

Gordon talks frankly about: * his tough childhood: his father's alcoholism and violence and the effects on his relationships with his mother and siblings, * his first career as a footballer: how the whole family moved to Scotland when he was signed by Glasgow Rangers at the age of fifteen, and how he coped when his career was over due to injury just three years later, * his brother's heroin addiction. * Gordon's early career: learning his trade in Paris and London; how his career developed from there: his time in Paris under Albert Roux and his seven Michelin-starred restaurants. * Kitchen life: Gordon spills the beans about life behind the kitchen door, and how a restaurant kitchen is run in Anthony Bourdain-style. * How he copes with the impact of fame on himself and his family: his television career, the rapacious tabloids, and his own drive for success.

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Reviews

Showing 1 - 5 of 5 reviews.

Review by
4

I'm a sucker for chef bios, and I loved Ramsay in 'Hell's Kitchen'. The book wasn't particularly well-written, I thought, but I enjoyed the story. it was very raw and genuine. The sort of book that makes me glad I didn't opt to be a chef. Interesting.

Review by
3

Gordon Ramsay is not a great writer but he does manage to write well enough to convey the essence of his puppy rotweiller personality movingly and his story - Glasgow abused child to billionaire chef -is an inspiring one. The cusine ladder he climbs to achieve his aim is fascinating and takes you from London, to Paris, to West Indies. The deals are mafia cum Dragons Den. I found it very genuine especially the section on the inadequacies he feels in coping with his junkie brother and how it feels like history repeating itself.Just wish he would stop fucking swearing all the time in the book. I can just about allow it in the pressure of a busy kitchen in a reality TV show but in a book!! Not cool. Not clever.

Review by
3

It considered it a good read, not because it was such a good book, but because it gave me a good background on Gordon Ramsay. And this is what biographies should do. It was written in a style which you can expect from the master chef with the F-word on his "toque" :-).

Review by
4

I'm a sucker for chef bios, and I loved Ramsay in 'Hell's Kitchen'. The book wasn't particularly well-written, I thought, but I enjoyed the story. it was very raw and genuine. The sort of book that makes me glad I didn't opt to be a chef. Interesting.

Review by
3

Well, it certainly reads like Ramsey wrote it himself. There was no ghostwriter. This is a very very short book, but interesting if you want to know more about his life up to now.