The Untethered Soul : The Journey Beyond Yourself, Paperback

The Untethered Soul : The Journey Beyond Yourself Paperback

3.5 out of 5 (3 ratings)


Who are you? When you start to explore this question, you find out how elusive it really is.

Are you a physical body? A collection of experiences and memories? A partner to relationships? Each time you consider aspects of yourself, you realize that there is much more to you than any of these can define.

In this book, spiritual teacher Michael Singer explores the question of who we are and arrives at the conclusion that our identity is to be found in our consciousness, the fact of our ability to observe ourselves and the world around us.

By tapping into traditions of meditation and mindfulness, Singer shows how the development of consciousness can enable us all to dwell in the present moment and let go of painful thoughts and memories that keep us from achieving happiness and self-realization. Divided into five parts, the book offers a frank and friendly discussion of consciousness and how we can develop it.

In part one, he examines the notion of self and the inner dialogue that all of us live with.

Part two examines the experience of energy as it flows through us and works to show readers how to open their hearts to the energy of experience that permeates their lives. Ways to overcome tendencies to close down to the rest of the world are the subject of part three.

Enlightenment and the embrace of universal consciousness are the subject of part four. And finally, in part five, Singer returns to daily life and the pursuit of "unconditional happiness." Throughout, the book maintains a light and engaging tone, free from heavy dogma and prescriptive religious references.

The easy exercises that figure in each chapter help readers experience the ideas that Singer presents.


  • Format: Paperback
  • Pages: 200 pages, Illustrations
  • Publisher: New Harbinger Publications
  • Publication Date:
  • Category: Meditation & visualisation
  • ISBN: 9781572245372



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Showing 1 - 3 of 3 reviews.

Review by

Full disclosure: I chose The Untethered Soul because of the cover. I looked at it and said to myself, "Self, a horse running wild and free on a beach? That is so damn cheesy, they might just be on to something."And, oh, they were.I could count the number of "self-help"/"personal growth" books I've read in my life on one hand, but I've always side-eyed them with interest. As I am in a MAJOR turning point in my life right now where I can't tell if it's all a shambles or it's just being re-built, I was looking for some guidance.There was nothing in The Untethered Soul that I haven't heard before, nothing that I hadn't already thought of myself. But it's the way that Singer says things, and repeats them (he repeats himself a lot, which I've read criticism about, but I think it's being used as a gentle way to drive really important points home) that really made all these things make sense to me. I am still not quite sure if I totally believe that my whole sense of being and my whole life is completely in my own control - I love science, so I understand chaos - but I am teaching myself to control some of it.I am not the kind of person that would all of a sudden turn my back on everything in my past and live by the rules of one author, and one book alone. However, reading this book has been a really important experience for me and has given me some basic tools to take control of the ways that my life changes in the next few months/years, instead of feeling totally out of it.

Review by

In very easily readable language Michael Singer provides a wonderful pre-meditation primer.

Review by

The Untethered Soul is a unique book and it obviously means a lot to a whole lot of people because I've never seen a book with a higher rating on Goodreads than this one. Yet I had some problems with it. For that, I'm a little embarrassed, to be honest. Nonetheless, I did.First of all, I don't normally pick up too many spiritual books to read. I bought this one on the recommendation of a relative. And I found it intriguing. Singer has some interesting concepts. He wants people to stop suffering, to be free, to find their consciousness, to become self aware, to attain true enlightenment. In that regard, it's largely an Eastern religious book, although Singer tries to "Westernize" it by mentioning Jesus (and other spiritual leaders) throughout the book. He begins with the voice in your head that is always talking to you, your own, always second guessing you, offering you advice, often wrong, etc. He writes that if the person behind this voice were on the sofa beside you, you would kick him out in a heartbeat, thinking him crazy. Not a bad point. He writes of the "monkey man," the person inside your head who makes your life miserable and how you can go about silencing him and attaining your true freedom. Yet at the same time, his instructions for doing this seem to me -- but apparently not to others -- to be rather vague, as though the reader already knows some of the steps for going about this. For instance, if your heart is closed, you'll be hurt by things. You need to open your heart to attain true happiness. Um, okay. How exactly do you "open your heart?" Cause I don't know how. I don't think it's as easy as just that.The book, while small and apparently easy to understand for many, seems fairly heavy to me. Perhaps that's because I'm stupid, although I've read an awful lot of philosophy over the years, but there's an awful lot of advice here, some of it quite good when you can follow it. And if I were to follow it, I'd have to read this book some five or six times to just be able to even try to follow all of the advice he gives. I can't do it with one reading. I tried out some of the things in the early chapters and it's quite difficult.In the later chapters, he starts to get pretty redundant. Actually, he is pretty much throughout the entire book, but it becomes more noticeable in the later chapters. He also starts talking more about God, which is the subject of his last chapter. I actually got something out of this, although I'm not sure I agree with everything he asserts.Singer believes one can become totally free and totally happy, but in order to do so, one has to seemingly completely clear oneself of any distractions and thoughts of virtually anything, becoming a nonhuman organism (in my words). That doesn't appeal to me. I think that's a weakness of both the book and his approach.The Untethered Soul is an ambitious book and parts of it are quite good, but I think some of it's pretty vague, some of it's pretty damn difficult to actually accomplish, some of it's boringly redundant, and it might be a little overrated by some. I'm glad I read it and I might reread it again at some point, but it's not the greatest book ever written. Nonetheless, recommended.