Graveyard Book Graphic Novel : Part 1, Paperback

Graveyard Book Graphic Novel : Part 1 Paperback

4 out of 5 (1 rating)


An irresistibly-brilliant graphic novel adaptation of The Graveyard Book by Neil Gaiman, adapted by award-winning illustrator P.

Craig Russell. This is the first of two volumes. Nobody Owens, known as Bod, is a normal boy. He would be completely normal if he didn't live in a graveyard, being raised by ghosts, with a guardian who belongs to neither the world of the living nor the dead.

There are dangers and adventures for Bod in the graveyard.

But it's in the land of the living that the real danger lurks, for it is there that the man Jack lives, and he has already killed Bod's family.

Each chapter is illustrated by a different artist, with contributions from P.

Craig Russell, Kevin Nowlan, Tony Harris and Scott Hamptom, Galen Showman, Jill Thompson and Stephen B.



  • Format: Paperback
  • Pages: 192 pages, chiefly illustrations (colour)
  • Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing PLC
  • Publication Date:
  • Category: Comic strip fiction / graphic novels
  • ISBN: 9781408858998



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This was an absolute delight as my introduction to the world of graphic novels. I totally loved P Craig Russell’s adaption of Neil Gaiman’s novel and spotting the subtle differences in illustration styles. Beyond that I feel too much of a newbie to comment on how this works as a graphic novel. But I will be reading more. This is a brilliant way to tell stories and I know I’m going to love learning the possibilities. Of course, as I love Neil Gaiman’s way with words as much as his story telling, I still have his original novel to look forward to.In terms of the story? Even in a world where we’ve grown used to all kinds of families, Bod’s is a little unusual. Following his narrow escape after the murder of his birth family by the man Jack, he’s raised by Mr and Mrs Owens (deceased) and a graveyard of ghosts. With a little help from a couple of more corporeal but no less unusual guardians. I always love the way Neil Gaiman’s children’s books are seriously, properly dark. In this case, let’s just say I’m not talking merely multiple murders. Just wait till you get to Bod’s puzzled reaction to Scarlett’s anger in the aftermath of the novel’s climax. Taken with Silas’s aside about his own past, it’s a deeply shivery moment. (This may be an entirely adult view, of course!)

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