The Global Cold War : Third World Interventions and the Making of Our Times, Paperback

The Global Cold War : Third World Interventions and the Making of Our Times Paperback

3 out of 5 (1 rating)


The Cold War shaped the world we live in today - its politics, economics, and military affairs.

This book shows how the globalization of the Cold War during the last century created the foundations for most of the key conflicts we see today, including the War on Terror.

It focuses on how the Third World policies of the two twentieth-century superpowers - the United States and the Soviet Union - gave rise to resentments and resistance that in the end helped topple one superpower and still seriously challenge the other.

Ranging from China to Indonesia, Iran, Ethiopia, Angola, Cuba, and Nicaragua, it provides a truly global perspective on the Cold War. And by exploring both the development of interventionist ideologies and the revolutionary movements that confronted interventions, the book links the past with the present in ways that no other major work on the Cold War era has succeeded in doing.


  • Format: Paperback
  • Pages: 496 pages, 15 b/w illus. 10 maps
  • Publisher: Cambridge University Press
  • Publication Date:
  • Category: General & world history
  • ISBN: 9780521703147



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This is an attempt to change the paradigm through which the Cold War is studied. Westad argues that the Cold War was not focused in Europe, but in the Third World, where the US and USSR fought proxy wars. Although giving the Third World more attention in Cold War study is a welcome change, his argument is a bit stretched. The beginning and end of the Cold War were arguably in Germany, so saying Europe is less important is difficult. The most impressive part of this work is the incredible detail he is able to extract from a variety of archives. He looks at conflicts in Vietnam, Afghanistan, Angola and the Horn of Africa. His analysis of each episode in impressive, more so than his overall analysis.