The Head of Kay's, Hardback
1 out of 5 (1 rating)


It is the general view at Eckleton school that there never was such a house of slackers as Kay's.

Fenn, head of house and county cricketer, does his best to impose some discipline but is continually undermined by his house-master, the meddlesome and ineffectual Mr Kay.

After the Summer Concert fiasco, Mr Kay resolves to remove Fenn from office and puts his house into special measures, co-opting Kennedy, second prefect of Blackburn's, as reluctant troubleshooter with a brief to turn the place around.

But without the backing of Fenn, and the whole house hostile towards him, how can he achieve the impossible...?


  • Format: Hardback
  • Pages: 176 pages
  • Publisher: Everyman
  • Publication Date:
  • Category: Classic fiction (pre c 1945)
  • ISBN: 9781841591810



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Set around the time of its 1905 publication, “The Head of the Kay’s” is another of P. G. Wodehouse’s school stories. Eckleton is the name of the all-boys’ establishment. Mr Kay is master of one house and is unpopular. He is unhappy with his head boy, Fenn, and arranges for Kennedy – of Blackburn's house – to come and take over as head prefect. Thus there’s a rivalry between Fenn and Kennedy whilst other members of Kay’s also cause trouble for the new arrival.Thankfully Wodehouse didn’t spend his career on this type of story, otherwise it’s doubtful he’d ever become as famous as he did – if at all. The other school stories that I’ve read range from below average to average, but this is his worst book out of all that I’ve read of his so far.The plot is simple to non-existent, featuring few surprises. The characters are dull, samey, and all male. Wodehouse became good at creating love interests. I miss the witty and beautiful female character(s) included in later books, plus the haughtier interfering women he portrays so well. Even the humour he is famed for is scarce in this novel.

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