The Regeneration Trilogy : Regeneration; The Eye in the Door; The Ghost Road, Paperback

The Regeneration Trilogy : Regeneration; The Eye in the Door; The Ghost Road Paperback

3.5 out of 5 (1 rating)


The Regeneration Trilogy is Pat Barker's sweeping masterpiece of British historical fiction. 1917, Scotland. At Craiglockhart War Hospital in Scotland, army psychiatrist William Rivers treats shell-shocked soldiers before sending them back to the front.

In his care are poets Siegfried Sassoon and Wilfred Owen, and Billy Prior, who is only able to communicate by means of pencil and paper...Regeneration, The Eye in the Door and The Ghost Road follow the stories of these men until the last months of the war.

Widely acclaimed and admired, Pat Barker's Regeneration trilogy paints with moving detail the far-reaching consequences of a conflict which decimated a generation. "Harrowing, original, delicate and unforgettable." (Independent). "A new vision of what the First World War did to human beings, male and female, soldiers and civilians.

Constantly surprising and formally superb." (A. S. Byatt, Daily Telegraph). "One of the few real masterpieces of late twentieth-century British fiction." (Jonathan Coe).


  • Format: Paperback
  • Pages: 912 pages
  • Publisher: Penguin Books Ltd
  • Publication Date:
  • Category: First World War fiction
  • ISBN: 9780241969144



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An interesting premise, & certainly the core of the trilogy sticks to the concepts & issues surrounding the effects of World War One trench warfare had on that particular generation. There's more to this than just an expose or revelation about poor psychiatric care in that era, there's commentary on poetry, young masculinity, paternalism & ideologies. Good, but at times, almost lost in its pathos. Would I recommend this? To those with an interest, most definitely, but to the general reader? Well, if you have an interest in human relationships, their fragility & the effects of war, you'd probably get something worthwhile out of this. It isn't for all readers however, & if you're not sure, I'd advocate leaving alone, as it can be a trudge to the uninitiated.

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