Poetry of the Thirties, Paperback
4 out of 5 (1 rating)


Auden, Day, Lewis, Spender, MacNeice and the other key poets of the 'Thirties' were children of the First World War, obsessed by war and by communalism, by the class-struggle and a passionate belief in poets as people whose actions are as publically important as their poems.

For them, the Spanish Civil War epitomized the mood of the times, as their symbolic obsessions were transmuted into tragic reality.

But from within their strongly defined unity of ideals, an astonishingly varied body of poetry emerged.

Robin Skelton has arranged the poetry to make an illuminating 'critical essay' of the period, and in his introduction he brilliantly probes the moods and mores of an intensely troubled and creative decade.




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This anthology is an essential library book, because it completes the gap between early modern poetry and the pre-WW2 era, focusing on the late twenties and early thirties. The poems are a reflection of the political concerns of the time, engaging with political issues. I liked the poetry centrered on the Spanish civil war, because it shows the growing fear of the rise of fascism and the political stance taken by the poets, their hopes and disillusions. Very good book, used as part of the Open University course A300 '20th C Literature'.

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