The Geneva Trap : A Liz Carlyle Novel, Paperback

The Geneva Trap : A Liz Carlyle Novel Paperback

4 out of 5 (1 rating)


When a rogue Russian spy warns her of a plot to hack into the West's military satellite systems, MI5's Liz Carlyle finds her past catching up with her...Geneva, 2012.

When a Russian intelligence officer approaches MI5 with vital information about the imminent cyber-sabotage of an Anglo-American Defence programme, he refuses to talk to anyone but Liz Carlyle.

But who is he, and what is his connection to the British agent?

At a tracking station in Nevada, US Navy officers watch in horror as one of their unmanned drones plummets out of the sky, and panic spreads through the British and American Intelligence services.

Is this a Russian plot to disable the West's defences? Or is the threat coming from elsewhere? As Liz and her team hunt for a mole inside the MOD, the trail leads them from Geneva, to Marseilles and into a labyrinth of international intrigue, in a race against time to stop the Cold War heating up once again...


  • Format: Paperback
  • Pages: 336 pages
  • Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing PLC
  • Publication Date:
  • Category: Espionage & spy thriller
  • ISBN: 9781408832189



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Another efficient novel from Stella Rimington, former head of MI5, once again featuring her immensely plausible and likeable protagonist Liz Carlyle.This novel is up to Rimington's normal high standard and boasts a plot featuring numerous twists and red herrings, and the action moves from Geneva to Marseilles, which significant interventions from MI5 and MI6 in London. Is there really a mole in the higher reaches of Operation Clarity, which governs the development of a new remote control system for drone missions? If so, for whom is he working? Rimington obviously knows the background to these issues in intimate detail, and gives a roller-coaster novel with frequent twists and turns but in which the plot and characters are always believable. Not as substantial or engrossing as John le Carre's book, but no less entertaining for all that.

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