Where the Dead Men Go, Paperback Book

Where the Dead Men Go Paperback

4.5 out of 5 (2 ratings)

Description

After three years in the wilderness, hardboiled reporter Gerry Conway is back at his desk at the Glasgow Tribune.

But three years is a long time on newspapers and things have changed - readers are dwindling, budgets are tightening, and the Trib's once rigorous standards are slipping.

Once the paper's star reporter, Conway now plays second fiddle to his former protege, crime reporter Martin Moir.

But when Moir goes AWOL as a big story breaks, Conway is dispatched to cover a gangland shooting. And when Moir's body turns up in a flooded quarry, Conway is drawn deeper into the city's criminal underworld as he looks for the truth about his colleague's death.

Braving the hostility of gangsters, ambitious politicians and his own newspaper bosses, Conway discovers he still has what it takes to break a big story.

But this is a story not everyone wants to hear as the city prepares to host the Commonwealth Games and the country gears up for a make-or-break referendum on independence.

In this, the second book in the Conway Trilogy, McIlvanney explores the murky interface of crime and politics in the new Scotland.

Information

  • Format: Paperback
  • Pages: 352 pages
  • Publisher: Faber & Faber
  • Publication Date:
  • Category: Crime & mystery
  • ISBN: 9780571239856

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Reviews

Showing 1 - 2 of 2 reviews.

Review by
5

Thrilling ThrillerThis is the second in Liam McIIvanney’s Conway mysteries and this is a fine example of what a crime thriller should be about. There is a wonderful pulsating pace throughout the book as the Glasgow underworld and all that brings weaves its way through the pages of the novel.Gerry Conway is the Political Editor of the Sunday Tribune after an enforced absence due to his previous role as the Crime Editor and bringing down a politician and a Gangland Godfather. He looks with some jealousy at his friend and colleague Martin Moir who now holds that job. It is not until he starts to worry about why he has not seen his friend for a few days that things start falling in to place, and when he is found dead it is Gerry who is pressing the police for action, as he runs a counter investigation.While doing the two jobs of politics and crime while investigating his friends death that brings him in to contact with the leaders of rival crime mobs, which brings him to contact with the leadership of Glasgow City Council. At the same time we are brought in to contact with a lot of “Glasgow baggage”, sectarian football support, the split up of the rival gangs, the UVF and UDA, eastern European prostitutes and heroin.Like all investigative crime journalists this brings him to the attention of all the major players in crime and politics, which always seem entwined, which in turn always means a funeral or two. Conway is so concerned about his own safety and the protection of his own family he has to watch as his partner goes to her parents in New Zealand and his ex-wife’s husband accepts a job in Aberdeen.This is a wonderful crime thriller which sees the death of a major crime lord by the son of another at the end of the book. But the thrill of this crime novel is in everything that builds to the ending like a crescendo of thunder and lightening. This is a wonderful crime read and well worth reading, as it brings to life the gritty underworld of Glasgow and how some need that underworld belly to survive in their own jobs. While at the same time that criminal underbelly is trying to legitimise the ways in which it makes money, and launders the rest of their own cash.Great read it – get it as soon as you can.

Review by
4

Synopsis/blurb.....After three years in the wilderness, hardboiled reporter Gerry Conway is back at his desk at the Glasgow Tribune. But three years is a long time on newspapers and things have changed - readers are dwindling, budgets are tightening, and the Trib's once rigorous standards are slipping. Once the paper's star reporter, Conway now plays second fiddle to his former protege, crime reporter Martin Moir. But when Moir goes AWOL as a big story breaks, Conway is dispatched to cover a gangland shooting. And when Moir's body turns up in a flooded quarry, Conway is drawn deeper into the city's criminal underworld as he looks for the truth about his colleague's death. Braving the hostility of gangsters, ambitious politicians and his own newspaper bosses, Conway discovers he still has what it takes to break a big story. But this is a story not everyone wants to hear as the city prepares to host the Commonwealth Games and the country gears up for a make-or-break referendum on independence. In this, the second book in the Conway Trilogy, McIlvanney explores the murky interface of crime and politics in the New Scotland.Another new author for me though I do have a copy of his debut novel – All The Colours Of The Town – sitting on the pile of unreads. Where The Dead Men Go is Liam’s McIlvanney’s second fiction outing and another book concerning his journalist Gerry Conway. Having recently finished Malcolm Mackay’s Glasgow hit-man debut earlier this month, it was strange landing back amongst Glasgow’s criminal fraternity this time viewed through the eyes of a hard-bitten hack. There is a common theme with these two books, namely organised crime. Does Glasgow suffer from gangs, drugs and prostitution to a greater or lesser extent than any other inner-city in the UK? Probably not. When the gangland rivalries do explode into violence, Glaswegian style the shadow of bigotry and sectarianism hangs over it, whether as the reason, a factor or as misdirection to confuse the authorities. Our main man, Gerry Conway has baggage to carry both on a personal front and career-wise. He’s back at the struggling Tribune a few years after his sacking and living in a flat with his girlfriend and baby son; whilst maintaining regular contact with his two boys from his failed marriage. Martin Moir, one time underling of Conway and now the star turn at the Tribune disappears and Conway gets shunted from his desk covering politics to fill the void on the crime desk. He’s assigned to report on a shooting on a soccer pitch. The discovery of the victim’s identity, threatens a return to the bad old days of feuding and blood-letting as the city’s gangs jostle for ascendancy and payback. When the gangland rivalries do explode into violence - Glaswegian style - the shadow of bigotry and sectarianism hangs over it, whether as the reason, a factor or as misdirection to confuse the authorities. The rest of the city braces itself for the backlash in the mean-time.When Moir’s body is found in his car at the bottom of a quarry, Gerry gets the crime gig on a more permanent basis. Moir’s death is ruled a suicide, but with Conway and Moir’s wife unconvinced, our intrepid reporter digs into Moir’s recent investigations and peels back the lid on a can of rotten worms....... murder, prostitution, pay-offs, corruption, dodgy contracts with the crime bosses and politicians as well as the media-hounds all inhabiting the same flea-ridden pit.Where The Dead Men Go was a superb read and a great introduction to another newish crime author for me. It registered slightly lower on the Richter scale for me than Mackay’s Lewis Winter book, but it was extremely enjoyable nonetheless.4 stars from 5I gained access to this book via the increasingly useful Net Galley website.