The Scottish Prisoner, Paperback Book
4.5 out of 5 (7 ratings)

Description

From the international bestselling author of the Outlander series, the terrific new novel featuring the ever-popular Lord John.1760.

Jamie Fraser is a paroled prisoner-of-war in the remote Lake District.

Close enough to the son he cannot claim as his own, his quiet existence is interrupted first by dreams of his lost wife, then by the appearance of Tobias Quinn, an erstwhile comrade from the Rising.

Lord John Grey - aristocrat, soldier, sometime spy - is in possession of papers which reveal a damning case of corruption and murder against a British officer.

But the documents also hint at a far more dangerous conspiracy.Soon Lord John and Jamie are unwilling companions on the road to Ireland, a country whose castles hold dreadful secrets, and where the bones of the dead are hidden, in an epic story of treachery - and scores that can only be settled in blood.

Information

  • Format: Paperback
  • Pages: 560 pages
  • Publisher: Orion Publishing Co
  • Publication Date:
  • Category: Historical fiction
  • ISBN: 9781409135197

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Reviews

Showing 1 - 5 of 7 reviews.

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Review by
5

I really enjoyed this book, my favourite of The Lord John books. There is a lot of Jamie in it and it answers a lot of the questions thrown up in the other Lord John books about the relationship between Lord John Grey and Jamie Frazer. It gives an insight into the some of the years that Jamie and Claire are seperated and just rounds out the story for you.It comes at a good time in the series about Jamie and Claire, if you are a fan and awaiting the next installment of the Outlander series, (which is due to be published in 2013) this just wets your appitite for it!!

Review by
2

Why this gets a two and I rate most of the series much higher? Jamie. I don't like the way the Outlander books are written. I tried to read two of them and fell asleep repeatedly. <br/><br/> I really hate authors who try to write in Dialect. I don't get the rhythm of the original language when I do, I get farce on what the language must sound like. It's something the person best leave alone unless they are that Nationality and grew up there and I'm sorry but Ms. Gabaldon isn't and she's annoying to my reading ear. This means I am missing all of Jamie's background. That has a huge impact on the book for me.<br/><br/>The other problem is, for some strange reason, the Jamie scenes tended to ramble. The Lord John series is nice tight and concise. This is not. It was like the author was hell bent and determined to cram an entire college lesson into a couple pages. Did it pertain? Sort of. Did it move the story along? Heaven's no. It dragged it to a stop and we had to wait until the author got over it and moved on. If it had been a verbal recitation, I would have found a cattle prod and used it on the author to get a move on.<br/><br/>After sleeping on this, I finally reached a conclusion that it was like she took two short stories and crammed them together to make the book. It never quite came together. We were either jaunting off on Jamie's point of view [annoying as all get out because that's when she started to ramble] or John's point of view [which got the story going again]. And I do have to note, if she would have rambled on well, I might have actually enjoyed it. Instead my eyes started to cross.<br/><br/>At the end like the beginning unless it had Lord John in it, I skipped the paragraphs with Jamie. One can only take so much emotional masturbation and Jamie's a regular god at it in this book. If I hadn't, I would not have finished it. I mean honestly by the end of the first 10 pages we KNOW he misses his wife. Then she spends the rest of the book telling us again and again he misses his wife. Almost like she had to prove it. Methinks the lad doth protest too much he loves and misses his wife. Makes me wonder if he's not in the closet.<br/><br/>The first half of the book, if I tossed out 90% of Jamie scenes, it would have got a 4.5. If it hadn't had the Lord John? It didn't deserve a full star.<br/><br/>I'm almost at the point where I think she's either a multiple personality one who writes Lord John and one who writes the other or she's got a ghost writer for Lord John. And if that was the case, the Ghost Writer is better.<br/><br/> De gustibus non disputandum est

Review by
4

Diana Gabaldon is my favorite author, but her Lord John books just haven't done it for me. I read one of them, but Grey doesn't hold my heart the way Jamie and Claire do, so I couldn't really get into it.<br/><br/>So I was a little hesitant to read The Scottish Prisoner, knowing that it takes place during the years Jamie and Claire were apart. Still, it had Jamie, so I couldn't resist. And I'm glad I didn't!<br/><br/>Yes, Grey was a prominent character throughout the book, but The Scottish Prisoner focused enough on Jamie that it worked for me. The scenes with Jamie and wee William, as well as the tangible force of Jamie's ache for Claire (and Brianna, though he doesn't know it at the time), was priceless.<br/><br/>The actual plot of the story (thwart the uprising and get the bad guy) was so so, but Gabaldon's brilliance in setting and historical placement shines.<br/><br/>In short, if you're missing Jamie Fraser, read this one. It won't be the crack high you get from him and Claire, but it should be enough to hold you for a bit while we're waiting for MOBY to come out in the fall of 2013.

Review by
5

Where to begin? I was pleased to read about Jamie and John. This book answered a lot of questions about their friendship. With Outlander series, not much is aid of Lord John Grey. <br/><br/>I love getting acquainted Hal and John. They are quite remarkable characters. They fight like any brother. But love and defend each other as fierce brothers should.<br/><br/>I want to give so much away, but promised I wouldn't spoil it. Such a wonderful story. A must read!

Review by
5

Where to begin? I was pleased to read about Jamie and John. This book answered a lot of questions about their friendship. With Outlander series, not much is aid of Lord John Grey. <br/><br/>I love getting acquainted Hal and John. They are quite remarkable characters. They fight like any brother. But love and defend each other as fierce brothers should.<br/><br/>I want to give so much away, but promised I wouldn't spoil it. Such a wonderful story. A must read!

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