Medicine, Health and Being Human, Hardback Book

Description

Medicine, Health and Being Human begins a conversation to explore how the medical has defined us: that is, the ways in which perspectives of medicine and health have affected cultural understandings of what it means to be human. With chapters that span from the early modern period through to the contemporary world, and are drawn from a range of disciplines, this volume holds that incremental historical and cultural influences have brought about an understanding of humanity in which the medical is ingrained, consciously or unconsciously, usually as a mode of legitimisation.

Divided into three parts, the book follows a narrative path from the integrity of the human soul, through to the integrity of the material human body, then finally brought together through engaging with end-of-life responses.

Part 1 examines the move from spirituality to psychiatry in terms of the way medical science has influenced cultural understandings of the mind.

Part 2 interrogates the role that medicine has played in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries in constructing and deconstructing the self and other, including the fusion of visual objectivity and the scientific gaze in constructing perceptions of humanity.

Part 3 looks at the limits of medicine when the integrity of one body breaks down.

It contends with the ultimate question of the extent to which humanity is confined within the integrity of the human body, and how medicine and the humanities work together toward responding to the finality of death. This is a valuable contribution for all those interested in the medical humanities, history of medicine, history of ideas and the social approaches to health and illness.

Information

  • Format: Hardback
  • Pages: 276 pages, 11 Halftones, black and white
  • Publisher: Taylor & Francis Ltd
  • Publication Date:
  • Category: Medical sociology
  • ISBN: 9781138301184

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