Staging France Between the World Wars : Performance, Politics, and the Transformation of the Theatrical Canon, Hardback Book

Staging France Between the World Wars : Performance, Politics, and the Transformation of the Theatrical Canon Hardback

Description

Staging France between the World Wars aims to establish the nature and significance of the modernist transformation of French theater between the World Wars, and to elucidate the relationship between aesthetics and the cultural, economic, and political context of the period. Over the course of the 1920s and 30s, as the modernist directors elaborated a theatrical tradition redefined along new lines: more abstract, more fluid, and more open to interpretation, their work was often contested, especially when they addressed the classics of the French theatrical repertory.

This study consists largely of the analysis of productions of classic plays staged during the interwar years, and focuses on the contributions of Jacques Copeau and the Cartel because of their prominence in the modernist movement and their outspoken promotion of the role of the theatrical director in general.

Copeau and the Cartel began on the margins of theatrical activity, but over the course of the interwar period, their movement gained mainstream acceptance and official status within the theater world. Tracing their trajectory from fringe to center, from underdogs to elder statesmen, this study illuminates both the evolution of the modernist aesthetic and the rise of the metteur-en-scene, whose influence would reshape the French theatrical canon.

Information

  • Format: Hardback
  • Pages: 176 pages
  • Publisher: Lexington Books
  • Publication Date:
  • Category: Theatre studies
  • ISBN: 9781498522786

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