Stories of World War One, Paperback Book
2 out of 5 (1 rating)

Description

Tales to remember yesterday's fallen - from today's bestselling authors.Compiled by Tony Bradman, this collection of short stories chronicles the events of World War One - imagining the conflicts and emotions of those people caught up in the war and its aftermath.

With stories from Malorie Blackman, Geraldine McCaughrean and Oisin McGann, among others, this anthology will be treasured for generations.

Information

  • Format: Paperback
  • Pages: 304 pages
  • Publisher: Hachette Children's Group
  • Publication Date:
  • Category: Anthologies
  • ISBN: 9781408330357

Other Formats

£7.99

£7.39

 
Free Home Delivery

on all orders

 
Pick up orders

from local bookshops

Reviews

Showing 1 - 1 of 1 reviews.

Review by
2

Short stories of WW1 from bestselling authors and compiled by Tony Bradman. This collection of short stories chronicles the events of World War One - imagining the conflicts and emotions of those people caught up in the war and its aftermath. I personally found only 3 stories that I could follow and keep me reading. These were 'The men who wouldn't sleep', 'Granny Measham's girl', and 'The unknown soldier'. These stories were quite poignant as they left me feeling that they had impacted on me in one way or another. Here is the first story that sent shivers down my spine. 'The men who wouldn't sleep' was about the men who were so shell shocked they wouldn't sleep and as a result ending up wasting away in convalescence homes. It follows the story of a young boy whose father is away at war and his mother (a nurse) has received word that her husband is missing. She takes her son to the hospital with her as she does not wish to let him out of her sight and it is there that the young boy sits with a soldier who does not talk and refuses to eat and sleep. The young boy opens up to the soldier and confides that he is scared that his dad might be dead and the soldier takes the young boy's hand and squeezes it. This being the only recognition the soldier has made since arriving at the hospital. He goes on to die still holding the young boys hand.