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The Turn of The Screw, Paperback / softback Book

The Turn of The Screw Paperback / softback

Paperback / softback

Description

The Turn of the Screw is an 1898 horror novella by Henry James that first appeared in serial format in Collier's Weekly magazine (January 27 - April 16, 1898).

In October 1898 it appeared in The Two Magics, a book published by Macmillan in New York City and Heinemann in London.

Classified as both gothic fiction and a ghost story, the novella focuses on a governess who, caring for two children at a remote estate, becomes convinced that the grounds are haunted.

In the century following its publication, The Turn of the Screw became a cornerstone text of academics who subscribed to New Criticism.

The novella has had differing interpretations, often mutually exclusive.

Many critics have tried to determine the exact nature of the evil hinted at by the story.

However, others have argued that the brilliance of the novella results from its ability to create an intimate sense of confusion and suspense within the reader.

On Christmas Eve, an unnamed narrator listens to Douglas, a friend, read a manuscript written by a former governess whom Douglas claims to have known and who is now dead.

The manuscript tells the story of how the young governess is hired by a man who has become responsible for his young nephew and niece after the deaths of their parents.

He lives mainly in London but also has a country house, Bly.

He is uninterested in raising the children. The boy, Miles, is attending a boarding school, while his younger sister, Flora, is living in a summer country house in Essex.

She is currently being cared for by Mrs. Grose, the housekeeper. Miles and Flora's uncle, the governess' new employer, gives her full charge of the children and explicitly states that she is not to bother him with communications of any sort.

The governess travels to her new employer's country house and begins her duties. The novella has been adapted numerous times in radio drama, film, stage, and television, including a 1950 Broadway play, and the 1961 film The Innocents.

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